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Most wines on the market were made to be uncorked within 1 to 5 years of purchase.

After that period, the wine will no longer taste delicious and will lose many desirable qualities. A wine that is meant to be aged will generally cost more ($50+) and will be designated for cellaring by the winemaker or your trusted wine source. Other clues that a wine should be cellared long term include high acidity, strong tannins, and excellent fruit. Since most wine is not made to be aged, you may be wondering if the bottle of wine that has been sitting in your pantry for many years is safe to drink.

Whether you are storing your wine for long or short-term storage, it is important to keep wine under the best conditions to ensure it tastes its best once uncorked. Ideally, your wine should be stored at a cool 55◦F in a dark room where it will not be exposed to prolonged sunlight or harsh overhead lighting. The relative humidity inside the space should be between 70-90%. You will want to keep your wine stacked carefully on its side or in a sturdy wine rack that will hold the bottle horizontally to ensure the cork stays moist. If you meet these conditions, you will prolong the life of the wine and ensure it does not spoil before its expiration date.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Can you store your wine upside down with the cork facing down? Yes, you can, but with a few caveats.

First, you must understand that if you store your wine on an upside-down or inverted wine rack, the sediment inside the bottle will settle by the cork. If a bottle has been resting with the neck down for a long time, once you turn the bottle right side up to remove the cork and pour a glass, most sediment will disperse into the wine. You will want to use a filter to remove sediment unless you do not mind the taste. Next, since wine and sediment will both be applying pressure to the cork, you will want to check for potential leaks regularly. These rules do not apply if you store wine with a screw cap or for bottles you plan to drink soon. Lastly (and perhaps most obvious), do not store wine that has been uncorked on an inverted wine rack. The wine will most definitely spill. Inverted wine racks are primarily used for decorative purposes or to showcase just a few bottles. They are not necessarily designed for long term storage. The best way to store wine bottles long term is on its side.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Serving wine at the proper temperature ensures you and your guests enjoy the intended balance of aroma, flavor, alcohol, and structure, as designed by the winemaker.

If the wine’s temperature is too cold or too warm, you will likely miss its flavor profile and character. There are many tools and methods to ensure your wine is served at just the right temperature; proper time spent in a cellar or wine cooler, a bottle thermometer, allowing the wine to decant at room temperature, and more. Red wines should generally be served slightly colder than room temperature between 62-68◦F. White wines taste best when served between 49-55◦F. It can be particularly challenging to keep both red and white wines cool during warmer seasons. One way to keep bottles cold for up to three hours is to use a wine bottle chiller.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

We have all had those puzzling moments where we are staring at our wine collection, trying to figure out where we put that delicious bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon.

We have all had those puzzling moments where we are staring at our wine collection, trying to figure out where we put that delicious bottle of Cabernet Sauvignon. If only we had organized our cellar a little more carefully, we wouldn’t have to pull out each bottle to find what we needed. Luckily, there are some easy ways to organize your wine cellar and keep track of what should be opened soon. Here are some tips to help you organize your cellar or wine rack.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

What do you do with an open, unfinished bottle of wine?

There is no need to waste leftover wine, pouring it down the kitchen sink. By taking the proper steps to store it, you can still enjoy your leftover wine for several days.

stopper in wine bottle

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Wall-mounted or hanging wine racks are stylish and functional pieces that free up valuable floor space while creating a beautiful display.

Whether you are storing your wine at room temperature or inside an insulated storage area such as a wine cellar, you will want to ensure that your wine rack is installed correctly. By taking the time to mount your new wine rack carefully, you can ensure that there will be no accidents, less permanent damage to your wall and that the wine is stored securely.

Before we discuss installation, please note that each wine rack will have its own unique set of instructions provided by the manufacturer. While we will provide basic guidance in this post to give you an idea of how much assembly may be required from a wall-mounted wine rack, it is also important to carefully read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Let’s begin.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

While wine bottles are commonly sealed with a cork, more and more winemakers use screw tops, sometimes called screw caps.

For hundreds of years, cork has been the preferred way to seal wine, but screw caps have become common since their invention in the 1950s. At first, screw tops were only associated with cheap wine, but screw caps can now be found on expensive bottles.

Aside from cork being an easy to attain material, there is another reason a winemaker may have chosen cork to seal bottles --- the proper amount of oxidization. Since cork is a porous material, winemakers have designed their wines to age over time by allowing the right amount of air to enter the bottle through the cork. This is why wine is traditionally stored on its side to keep the cork wet and minimize oxidization. Just enough air and the wine will develop its taste as it was intended. Too much air and the wine will lose its flavors and aromas.

bottles on wire rack

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Just like fashion, wine refrigerators evolve in style over the years.

Did you know there are many successful vineyards in places with frigid winter temperatures? One of the delicious results of a frosty weather is ice wine (e.g., icewine or eiswein). The next time you see snow on the ground, get excited! A new ice wine may be in the making.

Creative Lighting

In the past, wine refrigerators had a single bulb inside to illuminate the contents of the cooler. As the aesthetics of one's home becomes of greater importance, expect to see more wine refrigerators with attractive lighting that add to a room's ambiance without heating the wine inside the cooler. Vinotemp's newest wine fridges boast beautiful Backlit™ (baklīt) panel which toggles between three colors; Heliotrope, Amber, and Vinotemp BioBlu™ back-lit (U.S. Patent No. D868849).

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Chevy Chase's estate in Bethesda, MD, is now on the market for $2.4 million and the internet is buzzing over his gorgeous colonial style home.

The main level is said to have all the amenities one could desire; a grand foyer, butler's pantry, kitchen with quartz countertops and professional-grade appliances, and a large dining room that's perfect for entertaining. The lower level of the 6,481 sq ft luxury property includes a recreation room with a wet bar and a temperature-controlled wine cellar complete with a self-contained cooling system. Today we will show you how to get the look of Chase's cellar, minus the wine.

wine room with wire racking
Image source: Redfin

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David

Before you purchase a wine cooler, it is important to determine if the appliance you are interested in is freestanding or designed for built-in installation.

If you plan to recess your wine refrigerator into existing cabinetry, you must ensure it exhausts properly, so that it continues to operate efficiently. Let's review the differences between built-in and freestanding wine refrigerators.

What is a Built-in Wine Cooler?

A built-in wine cooler is designed with a front exhaust. When looking at the appliance from the front, you will notice there is a grill at the bottom of the unit, beneath the door. This is where the unit will expel hot air. Therefore, when installing your new wine fridge, you must ensure that the exhaust remains unobstructed. In general, you must leave at least ¼" of space on the right, left side, and at the top of the cooler. You must also leave 1-2" of clearance at the back of the wine refrigerator for proper air circulation.

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Comments | Posted By Desiree David
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